Bathroom Lighting Design

Bathroom Lighting Design

Bathroom Lighting Design

Bathrooms can pose an interesting challenge to lighting design. Like kitchens, bathrooms require practical and functional lighting solutions for a primarily task-oriented space. Grooming requires just the right amount of well-placed lighting. Too little and you won’t be able to see what you’re doing. Too much lighting, or poor placement can cause glare issues. However, like kitchens, you also want something beautiful. Something with style and quality that both suits your décor and creates a soothing environment. So how do you pick the perfect bathroom vanity lighting? It’s not as difficult as you might imagine. These days, a wide selection of wall mounted bath bars and vanity lights are available to provide the light you need in virtually any style. There are a few things to consider when choosing and installing your bathroom lighting. The following questions are the ones I hear most often from my customers (homeowners and interior designers alike). Cube Wall Sconce by Tech Lighting Help! The lighting in my bathroom is terrible and really unflattering. What are my options for really nice mirror lighting? Is that the same thing as vanity lighting? Where do I start? Yes, vanity lighting may be defined as a light fixture installed above, or alongside a mirror. We offer many vanity lighting options with excellent and flattering light output. Two measures to remember when selecting fixtures for your bathroom are CRI (Color Rendering Index), and color temperature. In terms of CRI, choose a fixture with a high CRI (90+ is preferred). Incandescent and halogen light sources always have the best CRI – 100 – meaning they most accurately render colors. If you wish to use an energy-efficient LED or fluorescent light source, ensure your selection has a CRI or at least 90. This provides excellent color rendering in bathroom settings. For color temperature, try selecting fixtures / light sources with a warm color temperature (2700K – 3000K). Many find warm color temperatures more flattering than cool ones, because they are similar to the incandescent lights most people have become used to. When I meet with clients, I work with them directly to determine the color temperature option they like best. That said, you never want to go above 3500K in a bathroom lighting application — it’s just not as flattering and inviting as warmer temperatures. In terms of fixtures, the Twiggy LED 1RE fixture is my personal favorite. It’s a high quality fixture with minimalist styling and great light output, it’s cool to the touch, and there are so many lengths to choose from. Generally 36-48 inch lengths are best for vanity lighting applications, but this also depends on the size of your mirror. Also, I highly recommend installing a low voltage electronic dimmer for this fixture to control its light output, and create a different atmosphere as needed. At what height should I install wall mounted bathroom lighting such as bath bars and vanity lighting? If you are mounting wall sconces on each side of your mirror, you should mount them with the center of the fixtures about 60″ high and about 28″ apart. If you are mounting a bath bar above the mirror, it should be mounted about 78″ high. These are generally-accepted measures from the American Lighting Association. At what angle should my lighting be mounted? This depends on the dimensions of your mirror or medicine cabinet. If the fixture is enclosed with a diffuser to create comfortable distribution of light, you don’t necessarily need an angled bath light. Some of the bath bars that we offer are angled, or are able to be angled. The Bardot, Audrey, and Twiggy Hinged LED vanity lights by Edge Lighting are all great selections that are able to direct the light towards you at about a 45 degree angle. Audrey Vanity with Square Canopy by Edge Lighting What are my options for energy efficient bathroom vanity lighting? Are LED fixtures available? LED and fluorescent fixtures are available for bathroom lighting. These are great energy efficient options that last a long time, and many LED Bath Bars and LED Vanity Lights are dimmable when paired with the appropriate dimmer. Traditional Incandescent and Halogen vanities are also dimmable, which can extend lamp life. Since bathrooms can get pretty wet, do I need special bathroom lighting, or can I use the normal fixtures that I’d put elsewhere in my house? For your shower and/or tub area, you would definitely need shower lighting that is wet rated. If you are interested in recessed cans, there are many options of shower-rated trims to choose from. Elsewhere in your bathroom you can use regular fixtures, but keep in mind that fabric typically stains from moisture or splashing, so glass, metal and plastic are better selections for bathroom lighting fixtures. How much light is the ideal amount for a bathroom? I always say the more lighting the better, because you can always dim lights. You want a lot of light for the bathroom — about 50-75 foot candles on your face — because of the variety of tasks done every day in that room. Consider a layered lighting plan for the bathroom. This is an ideal solution that can address the different lighting needs various areas in the bathroom. What is layered lighting, and why is it important in bathrooms? Layered lighting is very important for any room, but especially bathrooms. Because there are a wide variety of tasks done in a bathroom, (such as shaving, cleaning, grooming, applying makeup, and other general tasks), it is good to have layered lighting options designed for the specific needs of each task. For instance, in addition to bath bars or bathroom vanity lights at the mirror for face-based tasks, I also like to install a downlight mounted over the sink, about 12″ from the wall (with a dimmer, of course). This provides general illumination that fills the area over the sink. Mounting it back from the wall keeps the light out of your eyes. Other examples of light layers in bathrooms include wall sconces to help define the space, small chandeliers to provide general illumination, or even LED uplights installed in the shower for a unique take on task lighting in the shower. I like adding Edge Lighting’s Sun3 LED fixtures as uplights in the corners of the shower or using Port LED fixtures 3-4 inches off the floor in the wall or tile. Use different dimmers for each fixture to set different moods and accommodate various tasks. See our other article on bathroom lighting design to read more about the importance and effects of layered lighting in bathrooms. Left – Solace Bath Bar by Tech Lighting Right – Tigris Oval Recessed Mirror by Tech Lighting Looking for more information? Our lighting experts would be happy to discuss the best vanity lighting for your bathroom. Contact us at 954-4489
bathroom lighting design 1

Bathroom Lighting Design

By Elle Decor Staff May 3, 2016 From opulent to minimal, these light fixtures illuminate a bathroom’s design. View Gallery 50 Photos 1 of 50 2 of 50 3 of 50 4 of 50 5 of 50 6 of 50 7 of 50 8 of 50 9 of 50 10 of 50 11 of 50 12 of 50 13 of 50 14 of 50 15 of 50 16 of 50 17 of 50 18 of 50 19 of 50 20 of 50 21 of 50 22 of 50 23 of 50 24 of 50 25 of 50 26 of 50 27 of 50 28 of 50 29 of 50 30 of 50 31 of 50 1 of 50 For a San Francisco family, designer Ken Fulk revived a faded 19th-century landmark, transforming it into a multifunctional 21st-century house without losing any of its period drama. The marble tub in the wife’s bathroom is by Urban Archaeology, the wallcovering is hand-painted, and the flooring is by Fox Marble. Douglas Friedman 2 of 50 The copper sconces and pendants in the master bath of this Utah home are original to the house. The tub is by Kohler, the stool was made by a local craftsman, and the Navajo rugs are from 1910. Björn Wallander 3 of 50 The master bathroom of Alice Childress and Christopher Daniels’s downtown Manhattan loft, designed with the help of Courtnay Daniels Haden, includes a vintage Italian chandelier, an antique freestanding marble tub, and an inherited 18th-century painting. The custom-made vanities are outfitted with Caesarstone countertops and Kohler sinks; the sink and tub fittings are by Barber Wilsons & Co. William Abranowicz Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 4 of 50 The sconces in this French home are by Neirmann and the chandelier is by Tony Duquette. The tub in the master bath is by Jacob Delafon, with fittings by Waterworks, and the Veere Grenney chair is covered in an Armani/Casa fabric. The vanity, mirror, and marble flooring are all custom designs. Simon Upton 5 of 50 In the guest bath of this Cape Cod Cottage, the lighting adds a simple yet jovial touch to the room, which is painted in Farrow & Ball’s Chappell Green. Douglas Friedman Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 6 of 50 The chandelier in this Florida home is Venetian glass. The master bath also features custom-made cabinetry, sink fittings by Rohl, and a silver-leafed mirror by Eloquence. Richard Powers Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 7 of 50 Architect Achille Salvagni transformed this Roman Palazzo into a storied home, with a bathroom featuring a 1930s Venini chandelier, tub fittings by Lefroy Brooks, and a heirloom 1750 Italian stool. The striped wallpaper is by Ralph Lauren Home. Simon Upton 8 of 50 Thanks to a pair of brother architects, this apartment on Paris’s Right Bank has a dark and moody aesthetic that updates classic French style for the 21st century. The master bath holds a 1960s chandelier, a 1950s American table, and a Saarinen armchair. The niche is clad in hand-cut glass-mosaic tiles inlaid with gold leaf, the walls are of Italian marble, and the floor is tiled with marble and gold-leafed-glass mosaics. Nicolas Tosi 9 of 50 This guest bath features Vendome sconces by Thomas O’Brien for Visual Comfort, a salvaged 1920s tub and pedestal sink, and a Burmese teak mirror. Roger Davies Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 10 of 50 A sculpture by Louise Bourgeois overlooks a bathroom in French architect Jacques Grange’s Paris apartment. The chandelier is 19th-century; the bathtub, sink, and faucet are by L’Epi d’Or and the inlaid marble floor is based on a Byzantine pattern. William Waldron Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 11 of 50 In a guest bath of this Hollywood home, the vintage sconces and Emil Stejnar pendant are from Orange and the 19th-century mirror is Chinese. The tub is by Randolph Morris, the sink is by St. Thomas Creations, and all of the fittings are by Kingston Brass. Richard Powers 12 of 50 A circa-1960s light fixture by Sarfatti hangs above a Water Monopoly tub in this master bath; the side table is by Achille Salvagni, and the walls are sheathed in marble. Douglas Friedman Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 13 of 50 Monique Lhuillier’s bath showcases a custom-made light fixture by Foundry, white-oak cabinetry, and a photograph by George Hoyningen-Huene. Roger Davies 14 of 50 In the master bath of Drew Aaron and Hana Soukupova’s Manhattan apartment designed by Mark Cunningham, the sconces are by Ralph Lauren Home; a vintage chair is from the ’40s, a lacquered-glass stool is from DDC, and the print is by Andy Warhol. William Abranowicz 15 of 50 In this Italian apartment, a chandelier accompanies antique stone sinks, an Empire-style armchair, and an 18th-century Florentine birdcage in the bath; 19th-century seascapes from Capri hang on the wall. Simon Upton Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 16 of 50 A sparkling crystal light fixture adds a feminine touch to the contemporary master bath in the New York penthouse of fashion designerJill Stuart. Simon Upton 17 of 50 Sophisticated lighting and brass-and-marble étagère brings a touch of glamour to bathroom storage in the powder room of Mike Clifford’s historic Los Angeles Tudor house. Grey Crawford 18 of 50 The pendant lights in Courtney Cox’s master bath are custom made. The cabinetry and mirror frame in are ebonized white oak and the sink fittings are by Waterworks; the chair and ottoman are upholstered in a velvet by Rose Tarlow Melrose House, and the artwork was done by Cox’s father while he was in high school. Simon Upton Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 19 of 50 Elaborate sconces highlight Katie Ridder’s New York City bathroom, where she chose a medium-height antique shelf to compensate for limited countertop and cabinet storage. Eric Piasecki 20 of 50 The geometric pattern on this powder room’s lamp shades complements the pattern of a circa-1890 Tramp Art American mirror in a Southern California residence. The mural is by Jean Horihata, the stool is Chinese, and the sink fittings are by THG. Björn Wallander Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 21 of 50 A spherical chandelier and a repurposed, towering bookcase are highlights of a Tampa, Florida, home designed by Nate Berkus. Roger Davies Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 22 of 50 Understated lighting appeals to the minimal aesthetic of this bathroom in a modern Washington, D.C., home designed by Darryl Carter. The vanity hides drawers for storage. Richard Powers 23 of 50 Actress Meg Ryan created a relaxed oasis with the help of decorator Marsha Russell for her Martha’s Vineyard master bath, including a touch of quirk with hanging bulb lighting. An antique soapstone sink basin from LooLoo Design is set into a bluestone countertop with plenty of extra space for towels and shower accoutrements. William Waldron 24 of 50 In Brazilian architect Marcos Acayaba’s bathroom, the lamps are by Dominici. The vanity is made of concrete with panels sheathed in Formica. Richard Powers Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 25 of 50 Quaint lighting features lend to the charm of this California cottage, decorated by Madeline Stuart. An elegant chest serves as a linen closet. Björn Wallander Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 26 of 50 Traditional lampshades provide symmetry to the the powder room of a home in Florida. The marble sink is set into an antique Victorian faux-bamboo dressing table, the ceramic seat is from Mecox Gardens, and the walls are papered in Lyford Trellis by China Seas. William Waldron 27 of 50 Simple lighting provides striking contrast to the busy Finnish wallpaper from the 1950s adorning the walls of this Manhattan apartment powder room, decorated by Katie Ridder. Hanging above a simple yet stylish Waterworks sink, a vintage FontanaArte mirror echoes the wall color. William Waldron Advertisement – Continue Reading Below 28 of 50 The lighting in the master bath of Lorry Newhouse’s charming cottage adds subtle personality to the cheerful room. The mirror is by Waterworks, and the wallpaper is by Rose Cumming. Simon Upton 29 of 50 Designer Darryl Carter creates a master bath that is true to his Virginia farmhouse’s roots by employing a simple lamp he designed for the Urban Electric Co., a sink vanity made from an oak table, and a slim mirror that sits in front of the windows. Simon Upton 30 of 50 Candle lighting fixtures, tiles by Original Style and a 19th-century painted wrought-iron washbasin are in this Bordeaux, France, bathroom designed by Michael Coorengel and Jean-Pierre Calvagrac. William Waldron Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Advertisement – Continue Reading Below Next 20 Bathroom Mirrors To Inspire Powder Room Design Skip Ad Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Bathroom Lighting Design

Bathroom Lighting Design
Bathroom Lighting Design
Bathroom Lighting Design
Bathroom Lighting Design



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