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Fix Garage Door

Fix Garage Door

Dwight Eschliman/Stone/Getty Images Garage doors lead pretty simple lives. Up, down, up, down, over and over until they suddenly don't work the way they should. Fortunately, that simple life usually makes for relatively simple repairs. Sometimes, though, even reliable old garage doors bite the dust.If […]

Plastic Storage Cabinet

Plastic Storage Cabinet

At Lowe’s, we have everything you need to organize a garage. Think of us as your garage makeover specialists. We have an array of garage storage solutions to help redefine your space. Install wire shelving, metal shelving, metal garage cabinets and industrial shelving to keep […]

Garage Door Openers Reviews

Garage Door Openers Reviews

Types of Garage Door Openers Belt-Drive Garage Door OpenersChain-Drive Garage Door OpenersDirect-Drive Garage Door Openers Belt-Drive Garage Door OpenersBelt-drive openers use a metal-reinforced rubber belt to raise and lower the garage door. They are the most popular type of opener, but are also more pricey than chain-drive openers, and can be a challenge to install for DIYers.Chain-Drive Garage Door OpenersIf a belt-drive opener is a little too expensive for your budget, a chain-drive model can be a good alternative. These openers use a chain looped around a rail to raise or lower the door. The downside is that they tend to be noisy — a particular concern for garages that are attached to the house.Direct-Drive Garage Door OpenersInstead of a stationary motor moving a chain or belt to lift the door, a direct-drive opener's motor glides along a stationary, spring-tensioned chain. The most popular direct-drive openers are made by a German company and are sold under the Sommer and Direct Drive brand names. Reviewers praise their quiet operation, and they are very reliable, thanks to high-quality construction and the use of only one moving part. However, these openers are more costly than some belt-drive and chain-drive openers, even those that get equally good feedback. What about screw-drive openers? Screw-drive garage door openers are another type of direct-drive garage door opener. Once popular, and still available, screw-drive openers typically have less feedback and poorer ratings than other types. The screw-drive’s relatively simple mechanism, which moves up and down a threaded steel rod, makes for a powerful, low-maintenance garage door opener; but screw-drive models are both noisy and slow. We did not spot a screw drive model with sufficiently strong feedback to include in this edition of our report. Do you need a garage door opener? Garage door openers are a luxury under some circumstances, but become most appreciated when the weather turns nasty. They are also a near necessity if the task of opening and closing a garage door is too challenging, due to physical limitations. Most are relatively inexpensive and highly reliable, though unless you are very handy, you should probably budget for professional installation. Modern garage door openers include basic to advanced features that improve safety and deter break-ins. Examples include an automatic stop if a descending door encounters a solid object such as the hood of a car and light beam sensors that detect the presence of an object — or a person or pet — and stop a garage door’s downward movement before accident or injury can occur. Available security options include remote lockouts for when you will be away from home for an extended amount of time, remote codes that change after each use, and lights that turn on automatically when your garage door opens or if movement is detected inside. Most garage door openers include a remote that lets you open and close the door from the comfort and safety of your car. Some garage door openers support Internet connectivity, either as an add-on or built in. This allows you to use an app that lets you open or close the garage door from your smartphone or tablet, and monitor your garage door’s status (open or closed) from anywhere that you can connect to the net. Some garage door openers are compatible with HomeLink, a remote control technology that’s built into some automobiles. However, due to a technology change, many older HomeLink-equipped cars are not compatible with new HomeLink-enabled garage door openers without the purchase of an optional interface; you can also simply ignore your car’s built in controls in favor of the remote control that comes with the opener, but that’s a solution that seems to annoy owners. At first glance, there appears to be a wide variety of garage door opener brands, but a closer look reveals that most openers are made by just a handful of companies. For example, Chamberlain garage door openers are well regarded in their own right, but the company also makes garage door openers for Craftsman and LiftMaster. Likewise, the Overhead Door Co. manufactures Genie garage door openers in addition to its own brand. Finding The Best Garage Door Openers Our Sources1. Amazon.comGarage Door Openers2. HomeDepot.comGarage Door Openers3. Sears.comGarage Door OpenersSee All Finding the best rated garage door openers is a bit of a challenge. Quality professional reviews are hard to come by. The most current ones are from technology publications, but these typically focus on one model and deal with the new connected features, such as the ability to control and monitor the garage doors from your smartphone or tablet anywhere you can access the Internet. Fortunately, owners aren’t bashful about weighing in on their garage door openers. Though some models get only a handful of reviews others receive hundreds of unique ratings on sites such as Amazon.com, HomeDepot.com and Lowes.com. If you are interested in a Craftsman garage door opener, Sears.com is the place to visit. While our research reveals that no garage door opener is perfect, several models jump to the fore as offering good performance and good value in the eyes of owners. These are the openers that we’ve named Best Reviewed for this edition of our report. Elsewhere in This ReportBest Garage Door OpenersBelt-drive Garage Door OpenersChain-drive Garage Door OpenersDirect-drive Garage Door OpenersBuying GuideOur SourcesNext View the discussion thread.
garage door openers reviews 1

Types of Garage Door Openers Belt-Drive Garage Door OpenersChain-Drive Garage Door OpenersDirect-Drive Garage Door Openers Belt-Drive Garage Door OpenersBelt-drive openers use a metal-reinforced rubber belt to raise and lower the garage door. They are the most popular type of opener, but are also more pricey than chain-drive openers, and can be a challenge to install for DIYers.Chain-Drive Garage Door OpenersIf a belt-drive opener is a little too expensive for your budget, a chain-drive model can be a good alternative. These openers use a chain looped around a rail to raise or lower the door. The downside is that they tend to be noisy — a particular concern for garages that are attached to the house.Direct-Drive Garage Door OpenersInstead of a stationary motor moving a chain or belt to lift the door, a direct-drive opener's motor glides along a stationary, spring-tensioned chain. The most popular direct-drive openers are made by a German company and are sold under the Sommer and Direct Drive brand names. Reviewers praise their quiet operation, and they are very reliable, thanks to high-quality construction and the use of only one moving part. However, these openers are more costly than some belt-drive and chain-drive openers, even those that get equally good feedback. What about screw-drive openers? Screw-drive garage door openers are another type of direct-drive garage door opener. Once popular, and still available, screw-drive openers typically have less feedback and poorer ratings than other types. The screw-drive’s relatively simple mechanism, which moves up and down a threaded steel rod, makes for a powerful, low-maintenance garage door opener; but screw-drive models are both noisy and slow. We did not spot a screw drive model with sufficiently strong feedback to include in this edition of our report. Do you need a garage door opener? Garage door openers are a luxury under some circumstances, but become most appreciated when the weather turns nasty. They are also a near necessity if the task of opening and closing a garage door is too challenging, due to physical limitations. Most are relatively inexpensive and highly reliable, though unless you are very handy, you should probably budget for professional installation. Modern garage door openers include basic to advanced features that improve safety and deter break-ins. Examples include an automatic stop if a descending door encounters a solid object such as the hood of a car and light beam sensors that detect the presence of an object — or a person or pet — and stop a garage door’s downward movement before accident or injury can occur. Available security options include remote lockouts for when you will be away from home for an extended amount of time, remote codes that change after each use, and lights that turn on automatically when your garage door opens or if movement is detected inside. Most garage door openers include a remote that lets you open and close the door from the comfort and safety of your car. Some garage door openers support Internet connectivity, either as an add-on or built in. This allows you to use an app that lets you open or close the garage door from your smartphone or tablet, and monitor your garage door’s status (open or closed) from anywhere that you can connect to the net. Some garage door openers are compatible with HomeLink, a remote control technology that’s built into some automobiles. However, due to a technology change, many older HomeLink-equipped cars are not compatible with new HomeLink-enabled garage door openers without the purchase of an optional interface; you can also simply ignore your car’s built in controls in favor of the remote control that comes with the opener, but that’s a solution that seems to annoy owners. At first glance, there appears to be a wide variety of garage door opener brands, but a closer look reveals that most openers are made by just a handful of companies. For example, Chamberlain garage door openers are well regarded in their own right, but the company also makes garage door openers for Craftsman and LiftMaster. Likewise, the Overhead Door Co. manufactures Genie garage door openers in addition to its own brand. Finding The Best Garage Door Openers Our Sources1. Amazon.comGarage Door Openers2. HomeDepot.comGarage Door Openers3. Sears.comGarage Door OpenersSee All Finding the best rated garage door openers is a bit of a challenge. Quality professional reviews are hard to come by. The most current ones are from technology publications, but these typically focus on one model and deal with the new connected features, such as the ability to control and monitor the garage doors from your smartphone or tablet anywhere you can access the Internet. Fortunately, owners aren’t bashful about weighing in on their garage door openers. Though some models get only a handful of reviews others receive hundreds of unique ratings on sites such as Amazon.com, HomeDepot.com and Lowes.com. If you are interested in a Craftsman garage door opener, Sears.com is the place to visit. While our research reveals that no garage door opener is perfect, several models jump to the fore as offering good performance and good value in the eyes of owners. These are the openers that we’ve named Best Reviewed for this edition of our report.

Red Bedroom Ideas

Red Bedroom Ideas

Simon Upton By Kelsey Kloss Jul 29, 2016 Red is a hue that can evoke a number of emotions: It can be energizing and glossy in a living room, spicy and appetizing in a kitchen, and just sensual enough in a bedroom. However, choosing the […]

Sliding Glass Door Blinds

Sliding Glass Door Blinds

French Doors A common problem for French Door blinds is that the handles get in the way of functionality. The solution is to buy shallow blinds for your French doors that fit comfortably between the door and decorative handles. French door blinds should enhance the […]

Bathroom Shower Designs

Bathroom Shower Designs

BHG.com Bathrooms Shower & Baths Bathroom Shower Design Ideas Find ideas to create a gorgeous shower area in your bath. Facebook Pinterest Twitter Google Plus Email Print More Prev View all Next × Prev View all Next Prev View all Next Popular In Shower & Baths Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Walk-In Shower Ideas 15 Stylish Seats for Walk-In Showers Doorless Showers Like You’ve Never Seen Everything In This Slideshow 1 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Luxury Shower Enclosure This walk-in shower offers plenty of room for two, with a pair of rain-style showerheads at opposite ends of the 5×10-foot space. Glass panels keep the look open and airy and allow light from the windows to reach the rest of the bath. Solid-surfacing waterproof frames protect windows from moisture. Learn more about shower designs. 2 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Etched Glass Shower Panel Etched glass can add both function and beauty to a bath. Here, a satin-etched glass panel between the shower and bathtub provides privacy without blocking natural light. A curbless shower entry enhances accessibility and creates a smooth transition between the shower and surrounding bath. Limestone flooring is used throughout the room for an elegant, natural look, but smaller tiles are used in the shower area for better traction. 3 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Arched Entry An arched entryway enhances the old-world appeal of this shower enclosure. Inside the shower, a mix of gold Calacatta marble, French limestone, and white granite tiles offers natural texture and pattern and provides an elegant backdrop for bathing. Download our FREE Bathroom Remodeling Guide. 4 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Clean Your Shower — Better! Faster! Get tips to get a sparkling shower without a lot of scrubbing! 5 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Wraparound Views In this bath, the tub and shower are located within a glass-paneled space with teak decking. Double-pane glass walls are filled with clear layers of a conductive material, so the glass can fog over to provide privacy at the flip of a switch. If the homeowners flip the switch again, they can enjoy the view once more. Inside the shower, two traditional showerheads, a rain-style showerhead and a handheld fixture, add luxury. 6 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Steam Shower Room Clear glass walls extend to the ceiling, allowing this bathing space to function as a steam shower. The glass enclosure ensures the bathroom feels open and airy while allowing light from the windows over the tub to reach the shower. Frosty blue glass tile on the walls provides a peaceful, water-inspired color palette. 7 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Curved Shower Bench A built-in lounge chair custom-fit for the homeowner’s body combines comfort and elegance in this steam shower. Travertine tile offers a natural backdrop, while a blue-gray mosaic tile border adds pleasing contrast. A rain-style showerhead provides the impression of a soothing rain. 8 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Limestone Wall Add a sophisticated look to your shower with limestone tiles. In this bathroom, the warm and textural limestone complements oil-rubbed bronze fixtures and Italian-inspired scrolled tiles. An arched entry introduces architectural interest and emphasizes the room’s old- world style. Inspiring bathroom tile design ideas. 9 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Corner Shower Corner showers can be a great way to make the most of the space in a small bath. This shower adds vintage charm to a new bathroom, thanks to subway tiles with dark grout lines on the walls and hexagonal mosaic tile on the floor. A partial wall enclosure subtly separates the shower from the adjacent vanity area. Plan your dream bathroom with our free guide. 10 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower Curtain Statement Need ideas for updating your basic builder bath? Don’t underestimate the power of a stunning shower curtain and new tile. In this bath, mosaic glass tile that extends from floor to ceiling and a large-print shower curtain add bold personality to a small space. 11 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Double Shower Doors With doors on both sides, this shower is easily accessed from anywhere in the bath. Marble surfaces, a built-in bench, and a rain-style showerhead provide beauty and luxury. Glass on two sides admits welcome light, while a solid wall near the bathroom’s dual vanities affords privacy. 12 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Partial Walls Partial walls around this shower offer a welcome sense of enclosure, while glass panels above the walls ensure the shower feels light and airy. Iridescent glass mosaic tile on the upper walls and onyx slabs on the lower walls provide textural contrast within a soothing color palette. A strip of brown glass tile separates the two wall surfaces and mimics the look of a chair rail. 13 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Well-Defined Shower Floor Make a design statement with a shower floor that adds eye-catching color or interesting texture. In this bath, a custom blend of clear glass tile, opaque glass tile, and Carrara marble tile brings shades of white, gray, and blue to the shower floor. The floor’s unique pattern complements the aqua wall tiles and adds lively pattern underfoot. Two showerheads and a corner bench ensure the shower is as practical as it is stylish. Find out about the best options for the floors in your bathroom. 14 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Frameless Shower Enclosure Frameless showers showcase tile work and add spaciousness to a bath. They can bring a contemporary edge to the room and make even small baths live large. This frameless enclosure shows off the shower’s classic tile treatments: white subway tile on the walls and black-and-white mosaic tile on the floor. Pick the best tile for your shower. Get ideas here. 15 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Curved Shower Wall An S-shape wall on one side of this shower references the flow of waves and serves as a stunning focal point for the bathroom. Covered in shimmering glass tiles, the wall features a glass panel in the center to admit light into the shower. With a low curb, extra-wide entrance, bench, and handheld showerhead, this stylish shower is easily accessible for everyone. 16 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Sloped Ceiling Positioning the shower under a sloping roofline of a dormer or pitched roof can create a dramatic focal point and make good use of existing space. This spacious shower includes multiple showerheads and a pleasing mix of white, gray, and black tile that remains visible behind glass doors. 17 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Glass Tile Walls Glass tile can add subtle shimmer behind the glass doors of a frameless enclosure, transforming a basic shower into a design focal point. Here, narrow bars of neutral glass tile surround both the shower and tub with an iridescent surface that complements the bath’s sand-tone travertine floor. 18 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Seamless Tub/Shower Wall A separate shower and bathtub adds luxury, but consider combining these distinct areas into a single wall unit for a seamless look. Here, a spacious shower shares a half-wall with the tub, which eliminates an awkward gap between the two bathing spaces and complements the bath’s clean-lined style. 19 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Skylight Shower A skylight over this spacious shower provides abundant light and views of the nearby ocean—so it’s almost like showering outside. Set into the home’s steep roofline, the bottom of the operable skylight is placed at roughly shoulder height to maintain privacy. Floor tiles mimic the sand tones of the beach, while subway tiles on the walls and ceiling reference the teal hue of the ocean. 20 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Accommodating Shower Design This shower is simple and elegant and features a 36-inch wide doorway that can accommodate a chair, and for an even more accessible optoin, consider a barrer-free design without a step. Inside 1 ½-inch tiles feature more grout lines than large-scale tiles to provide more traction and help prevent falls. Shower controls are also placed at an easy-to-reach height. 21 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Focal-Point Tile Work Mix and match tile in your shower to create a design focal point—especially if you are installing glass doors that will allow the tile to be seen from anywhere in the bath. This shower includes two frames of dark tiles around the showerhead and on the floor, which stand out from the surrounding stone tiles and attract the eye. 22 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Next Slideshow Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Find design inspiration in 15 walk-in showers that beautifully stretch a small bathroom’s footprint, increase its functionality, and amplify its good looks. Begin Slideshow » Related Walk-In Shower Ideas 15 Stylish Seats for Walk-In Showers Doorless Showers Like You’ve Never Seen
bathroom shower designs 1

Prev View all Next × Prev View all Next Prev View all Next Popular In Shower & Baths Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Walk-In Shower Ideas 15 Stylish Seats for Walk-In Showers Doorless Showers Like You’ve Never Seen Everything In This Slideshow 1 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Luxury Shower Enclosure This walk-in shower offers plenty of room for two, with a pair of rain-style showerheads at opposite ends of the 5×10-foot space. Glass panels keep the look open and airy and allow light from the windows to reach the rest of the bath. Solid-surfacing waterproof frames protect windows from moisture. Learn more about shower designs. 2 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Etched Glass Shower Panel Etched glass can add both function and beauty to a bath. Here, a satin-etched glass panel between the shower and bathtub provides privacy without blocking natural light. A curbless shower entry enhances accessibility and creates a smooth transition between the shower and surrounding bath. Limestone flooring is used throughout the room for an elegant, natural look, but smaller tiles are used in the shower area for better traction. 3 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Arched Entry An arched entryway enhances the old-world appeal of this shower enclosure. Inside the shower, a mix of gold Calacatta marble, French limestone, and white granite tiles offers natural texture and pattern and provides an elegant backdrop for bathing. Download our FREE Bathroom Remodeling Guide. 4 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Clean Your Shower — Better! Faster! Get tips to get a sparkling shower without a lot of scrubbing! 5 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Wraparound Views In this bath, the tub and shower are located within a glass-paneled space with teak decking. Double-pane glass walls are filled with clear layers of a conductive material, so the glass can fog over to provide privacy at the flip of a switch. If the homeowners flip the switch again, they can enjoy the view once more. Inside the shower, two traditional showerheads, a rain-style showerhead and a handheld fixture, add luxury. 6 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Steam Shower Room Clear glass walls extend to the ceiling, allowing this bathing space to function as a steam shower. The glass enclosure ensures the bathroom feels open and airy while allowing light from the windows over the tub to reach the shower. Frosty blue glass tile on the walls provides a peaceful, water-inspired color palette. 7 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Curved Shower Bench A built-in lounge chair custom-fit for the homeowner’s body combines comfort and elegance in this steam shower. Travertine tile offers a natural backdrop, while a blue-gray mosaic tile border adds pleasing contrast. A rain-style showerhead provides the impression of a soothing rain. 8 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Limestone Wall Add a sophisticated look to your shower with limestone tiles. In this bathroom, the warm and textural limestone complements oil-rubbed bronze fixtures and Italian-inspired scrolled tiles. An arched entry introduces architectural interest and emphasizes the room’s old- world style. Inspiring bathroom tile design ideas. 9 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Corner Shower Corner showers can be a great way to make the most of the space in a small bath. This shower adds vintage charm to a new bathroom, thanks to subway tiles with dark grout lines on the walls and hexagonal mosaic tile on the floor. A partial wall enclosure subtly separates the shower from the adjacent vanity area. Plan your dream bathroom with our free guide. 10 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower Curtain Statement Need ideas for updating your basic builder bath? Don’t underestimate the power of a stunning shower curtain and new tile. In this bath, mosaic glass tile that extends from floor to ceiling and a large-print shower curtain add bold personality to a small space. 11 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Double Shower Doors With doors on both sides, this shower is easily accessed from anywhere in the bath. Marble surfaces, a built-in bench, and a rain-style showerhead provide beauty and luxury. Glass on two sides admits welcome light, while a solid wall near the bathroom’s dual vanities affords privacy. 12 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Partial Walls Partial walls around this shower offer a welcome sense of enclosure, while glass panels above the walls ensure the shower feels light and airy. Iridescent glass mosaic tile on the upper walls and onyx slabs on the lower walls provide textural contrast within a soothing color palette. A strip of brown glass tile separates the two wall surfaces and mimics the look of a chair rail. 13 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Well-Defined Shower Floor Make a design statement with a shower floor that adds eye-catching color or interesting texture. In this bath, a custom blend of clear glass tile, opaque glass tile, and Carrara marble tile brings shades of white, gray, and blue to the shower floor. The floor’s unique pattern complements the aqua wall tiles and adds lively pattern underfoot. Two showerheads and a corner bench ensure the shower is as practical as it is stylish. Find out about the best options for the floors in your bathroom. 14 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Frameless Shower Enclosure Frameless showers showcase tile work and add spaciousness to a bath. They can bring a contemporary edge to the room and make even small baths live large. This frameless enclosure shows off the shower’s classic tile treatments: white subway tile on the walls and black-and-white mosaic tile on the floor. Pick the best tile for your shower. Get ideas here. 15 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Curved Shower Wall An S-shape wall on one side of this shower references the flow of waves and serves as a stunning focal point for the bathroom. Covered in shimmering glass tiles, the wall features a glass panel in the center to admit light into the shower. With a low curb, extra-wide entrance, bench, and handheld showerhead, this stylish shower is easily accessible for everyone. 16 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Shower with Sloped Ceiling Positioning the shower under a sloping roofline of a dormer or pitched roof can create a dramatic focal point and make good use of existing space. This spacious shower includes multiple showerheads and a pleasing mix of white, gray, and black tile that remains visible behind glass doors. 17 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Glass Tile Walls Glass tile can add subtle shimmer behind the glass doors of a frameless enclosure, transforming a basic shower into a design focal point. Here, narrow bars of neutral glass tile surround both the shower and tub with an iridescent surface that complements the bath’s sand-tone travertine floor. 18 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Seamless Tub/Shower Wall A separate shower and bathtub adds luxury, but consider combining these distinct areas into a single wall unit for a seamless look. Here, a spacious shower shares a half-wall with the tub, which eliminates an awkward gap between the two bathing spaces and complements the bath’s clean-lined style. 19 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Skylight Shower A skylight over this spacious shower provides abundant light and views of the nearby ocean—so it’s almost like showering outside. Set into the home’s steep roofline, the bottom of the operable skylight is placed at roughly shoulder height to maintain privacy. Floor tiles mimic the sand tones of the beach, while subway tiles on the walls and ceiling reference the teal hue of the ocean. 20 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Accommodating Shower Design This shower is simple and elegant and features a 36-inch wide doorway that can accommodate a chair, and for an even more accessible optoin, consider a barrer-free design without a step. Inside 1 ½-inch tiles feature more grout lines than large-scale tiles to provide more traction and help prevent falls. Shower controls are also placed at an easy-to-reach height. 21 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Focal-Point Tile Work Mix and match tile in your shower to create a design focal point—especially if you are installing glass doors that will allow the tile to be seen from anywhere in the bath. This shower includes two frames of dark tiles around the showerhead and on the floor, which stand out from the surrounding stone tiles and attract the eye. 22 of 22 Facebook Pinterest Next Slideshow Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Absolutely Stunning Walk-In Showers for Small Baths Find design inspiration in 15 walk-in showers that beautifully stretch a small bathroom’s footprint, increase its functionality, and amplify its good looks. Begin Slideshow » Related Walk-In Shower Ideas 15 Stylish Seats for Walk-In Showers Doorless Showers Like You’ve Never Seen

Yellow Kitchen Ideas

Yellow Kitchen Ideas

BHG.com Kitchens Kitchen Color Schemes Kitchen Color Inspiration Yellow Kitchen Design Ideas These yellow kitchens are sunny, warm, and calming. From bold yellow to muted cream, you’ll find a shade of yellow here that will help your kitchen develop a sunny personality. Facebook Pinterest Twitter […]

Evansville Garage Doors

Evansville Garage Doors

Boost Curb Appeal and Convenience With a New Garage DoorGarage door sales and service in Illinois, Indiana and northern KentuckyWhen you want to upgrade your existing property or enhance your new property with a stunning, reliable garage door, call on the original Overhead Door Company. […]

Painting A Bathroom Vanity

Painting A Bathroom Vanity

Are you looking at your bathroom vanity thinking it has only one place to go — the trash? Well, think again. Learn how to save that dated vanity and make it look like new without spending much money. Related Article How to Make a DIY Bathroom Mirror FrameDoes your bathroom need a life buoy to save it from a bygone era? Prep your bathroom cabinet for paintTo get a flawless finish on your paint job, spend some time prepping the cabinet for paint. Begin by cleaning the surface with a mild cleanser to remove any toothpaste splatters and greasy fingerprints. Here's the vanity before I started updating it. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Remove the doors from the vanity to give you easier access for painting. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Remove hinges and knobs. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Store hardware in a zip-close bag to prevent tiny screws and parts from being lost. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Look over the vanity for scratches, gouges and holes. Fill them with wood putty and allow it to harden. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Sand the repaired areas smooth. Lightly sand the rest of the vanity to give it some “tooth” for the paint to stick to. There’s no need to completely sand the existing finish off. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wipe off any sanding dust with a damp rag. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Paint your bathroom cabinetYou can use one of three types of paint on your vanity: oil-based, latex or chalk-finish paint.  If you use an oil-based or latex paint, you'll need to use a primer first. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) In the past, an oil-based paint was usually preferred for cabinets in the bathroom or kitchen because of excellent leveling properties and a hard finish that was resistant to chipping. Unfortunately, oil paint has a strong odor and is harder to clean up. Luckily, improvements to latex paints have made them almost as durable as oil paint. Latex (water-based) paints made for doors, windows and trim are a good choice for cabinets. This type of paint has an added hardener and excellent leveling properties. Both latex and oil paint require a coat of primer on your vanity before painting. A third option is to use chalk-finish paint. Many furniture painters like the ease of painting with chalk-finish paint because it doesn’t require a primer coat first. There are many chalk-finish paint brands available on the market today.  Related Article Painting Furniture with Chalk PaintTake do-it-yourself furniture painting to a new level with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. If using latex or oil paint, prime your vanity. If you are using a chalk paint, go straight to painting. Follow the wood grain of the cabinet when applying paint. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Allow to dry, and then add a second coat of paint. Chalk paint enthusiasts like the matte, buttery finish of a furniture wax applied over the paint. Use a wax brush to apply furniture wax in circular motions onto the vanity. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wait a minute and buff off any excess wax with a clean, dry rag. Apply a second coat of wax if the finish feels dry and chalky. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl You may choose to apply a polycrylic coat for a more maintenance-free finish. That’s up to you and the users of the bathroom. (Have small kids that are rough on your home? Opt for the polycrylic.) Replace dated knobs and hinges if desired. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Now, about that countertop and faucet. Do you need to trash those? If so, I give you permission. You can purchase new ones at your local home improvement store. Here's my finished project! (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Enjoy your newly saved vanity! Aren’t you glad you didn’t throw it away? Ready to update your bathroom vanity? Feel free to ask any questions in the comments section below.   Are you a DIY expert? Do you have your own blog or website to prove it? Contact us to learn more about blogging opportunities with Angie’s List.
painting a bathroom vanity 1

Well, think again. Learn how to save that dated vanity and make it look like new without spending much money. Related Article How to Make a DIY Bathroom Mirror FrameDoes your bathroom need a life buoy to save it from a bygone era? Prep your bathroom cabinet for paintTo get a flawless finish on your paint job, spend some time prepping the cabinet for paint. Begin by cleaning the surface with a mild cleanser to remove any toothpaste splatters and greasy fingerprints. Here's the vanity before I started updating it. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Remove the doors from the vanity to give you easier access for painting. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Remove hinges and knobs. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Store hardware in a zip-close bag to prevent tiny screws and parts from being lost. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Look over the vanity for scratches, gouges and holes. Fill them with wood putty and allow it to harden. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Sand the repaired areas smooth. Lightly sand the rest of the vanity to give it some “tooth” for the paint to stick to. There’s no need to completely sand the existing finish off. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wipe off any sanding dust with a damp rag. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Paint your bathroom cabinetYou can use one of three types of paint on your vanity: oil-based, latex or chalk-finish paint.  If you use an oil-based or latex paint, you'll need to use a primer first. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) In the past, an oil-based paint was usually preferred for cabinets in the bathroom or kitchen because of excellent leveling properties and a hard finish that was resistant to chipping. Unfortunately, oil paint has a strong odor and is harder to clean up. Luckily, improvements to latex paints have made them almost as durable as oil paint. Latex (water-based) paints made for doors, windows and trim are a good choice for cabinets. This type of paint has an added hardener and excellent leveling properties. Both latex and oil paint require a coat of primer on your vanity before painting. A third option is to use chalk-finish paint. Many furniture painters like the ease of painting with chalk-finish paint because it doesn’t require a primer coat first. There are many chalk-finish paint brands available on the market today.  Related Article Painting Furniture with Chalk PaintTake do-it-yourself furniture painting to a new level with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. If using latex or oil paint, prime your vanity. If you are using a chalk paint, go straight to painting. Follow the wood grain of the cabinet when applying paint. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Allow to dry, and then add a second coat of paint. Chalk paint enthusiasts like the matte, buttery finish of a furniture wax applied over the paint. Use a wax brush to apply furniture wax in circular motions onto the vanity. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wait a minute and buff off any excess wax with a clean, dry rag. Apply a second coat of wax if the finish feels dry and chalky. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl You may choose to apply a polycrylic coat for a more maintenance-free finish. That’s up to you and the users of the bathroom. (Have small kids that are rough on your home? Opt for the polycrylic.) Replace dated knobs and hinges if desired. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Now, about that countertop and faucet. Do you need to trash those? If so, I give you permission. You can purchase new ones at your local home improvement store. Here's my finished project! (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Enjoy your newly saved vanity! Aren’t you glad you didn’t throw it away? Ready to update your bathroom vanity? Feel free to ask any questions in the comments section below.   Are you a DIY expert? Do you have your own blog or website to prove it? Contact us to learn more about blogging opportunities with Angie’s List.
painting a bathroom vanity 2

Instructions Follow these instructions whether you’re refinishing an existing vanity or painting the bare wood of a new, unfinished vanity. Because you’ll need to remove the doors and hardware from an existing vanity, this is a good time to upgrade the knobs and pulls. For a complete makeover add a new vanity top, sink, faucet, and backsplash. Prep the Vanity for Painting Step 1 Remove the cabinet doors, drawers, false drawer fronts, and any attached hardware. If you plan to replace the vanity top and sink, remove these as well for easier access and less masking later. If the cabinet has working drawers, remove them from the cabinet. Then unscrew the drawer fronts, where possible, and finish them separately. Good to KnowIf you want to replace the cabinet knobs and pulls but the new hardware won’t fit the old holes, now’s the time to fill the existing holes with wood putty and sand smooth before priming. Step 2 Using trisodium phosphate (TSP) cleaner and a scrubbing pad or sponge, thoroughly wash all surfaces to be painted. Then rinse at least twice with fresh water and a sponge. Good to KnowIf rubber cabinet bumpers you peel or scrape off leave behind an adhesive residue, remove it with mineral spirits while working in a well-ventilated area. Then wash the areas with TSP. Step 3 For wood surfaces protected by a clear finish, sand with 220-grit sandpaper to remove any gloss. Reach into the inside corners of the cabinet panels and recesses of any moulding. Step 4 For previously painted surfaces, remove any loose or damaged paint. Sand to feather the edges of the paint with the bare wood and apply a latex primer to the bare spots. Step 5 For melamine or thermofoil-covered surfaces, common on cabinet sides and some doors, check that the plastic film is firmly bonded to the material underneath. If not, consider removing all of the film by using a heat gun to loosen the remaining adhesive. After the film is gone, use a rag with alcohol or mineral spirits to wipe off the adhesive. If the film is firmly bonded to the backing, sand it lightly with 220-grit sandpaper just until the surface becomes dull. Good to KnowSome film surfaces may be loosened by the primer you use. Check them carefully as you work and after the first coat of primer dries. Step 6 For all surfaces, vacuum any sanding dust and wipe the surfaces clean with a soft damp cloth. Step 7 Use painter’s tape to mask off the underside of the vanity top, adjoining walls, floor, and the inside face of the cabinet frame. Prime the Surfaces for Painting Step 1 Even if you plan to apply a combination paint and primer, a dedicated primer may be necessary to overcome problems with the vanity surfaces. For sanded bare wood and painted surfaces, apply an even coat of primer and sand smooth. If you notice any dings or surface damage, patch them with putty, sand smooth, and apply primer to the spots. Good to KnowThe glossier the paint you plan to apply, the smoother you need to make the primed surface. Flat finishes will hide small surface imperfections, but a gloss finish enhances them. Step 2 For thermofoil and melamine surfaces — even after sanding — you’ll need the stickiness of a shellac-based primer. Brush or roll on two coats and check for loose film. Good to KnowMatch the brush to the primer you use. For example, latex primer (and paint) is best applied using a synthetic-bristle brush. A shellac-based or oil-based primer should be applied using a fine natural-bristle brush. For the smoothest finish, buy the best quality brush you can afford. Step 3 After the first coat of primer, sand lightly and wipe the surfaces clean. Apply a second coat of primer as needed and let dry overnight. Paint and Reassemble the Vanity Step 1 Brush or roll on the first coat of paint and let dry. Then add two additional coats to protect the surfaces from daily use. Remove the tape, let the third coat dry overnight, and reassemble the vanity. Good to KnowOn a raised-panel cabinet door, notice that the panel is loose within the frame (even if it doesn’t move when you touch it). That allows the wood to shrink and swell with seasonal humidity changes. When painting panels, use the tip of your brush to force paint into the tiny gap between the panel and frame. Otherwise, the panel will expose an unpainted strip when it shrinks. Step 2 Drill holes in the cabinet doors and drawers as needed for new hardware. Then screw the drawer pulls and door handles in position. Step 3 Reinstall the door hinges and loosely fasten the door to the cabinet frame. For two facing doors, adjust the door positions using the hinges until the adjoining door frame edges are even; then tighten the screws. Good to KnowGot a mounting screw that won’t tighten or constantly comes loose? Apply wood glue to a wooden toothpick or match and insert it into the hole. Break off the surplus portion of the wood and allow the glue to dry for an hour. Then insert the screw as you normally would. Step 4 If you removed the drawer fronts or false fronts for finishing, reattach them to the drawer boxes and cabinet. Replace the drawers and check that they slide open easily. Step 5 Add new cabinet bumpers to the doors. Then replace the countertop, sink, and faucet as needed.

Replacement Garage Door Panels

Replacement Garage Door Panels

How to Replace Garage Door Panels Help! I damaged one section of my garage door. Can I buy a replacement section or do I need a new door? It’s a question we hear frequently from homeowners. The good news is that more often than not […]


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Dwight Eschliman/Stone/Getty Images Garage doors lead pretty simple lives. Up, down, up, down, over and over until they suddenly don't work the way they should. Fortunately, that simple life usually makes for relatively simple repairs. Sometimes, though, even reliable old garage doors bite the dust.If you are having trouble with your garage door, here are some tips on what to do.Quick Garage Door FixesWhen your garage door starts acting up, more often than not it is telling you it's time to do a bit of maintenance. So, before hitting the panic button, try these simple repairs. First, examine the rollers and tracks. If you can't remember the last time you cleaned them (and they look the part!), give them a good brushing and then add some lubricant. Next, perform these simple garage door maintenance tasks.If none of this fixes your problems, or if you would rather just let someone else fuss with the problem, take a look at How To Find the Best Garage Door Installers and Repairmen.Silencing a Noisy Garage DoorNoisy garage doors cause all kinds problems, especially for anyone who has to sleep above or next to the garage. Fortunately, most noisy garage door problems can be fixed with a combination of routine maintenance and the replacement of a few parts. For more information on the latter, see How To Quiet a Noisy Garage Door.Frozen Garage Door?It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, those also happen to be the kinds of days when cold and moisture combine to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button.Other times, however, the door refuses to budge. When this happens to you, stop hoping that if you hit that button enough times, a miracle will happen. About the only thing that is going to happen is that you cause a much bigger problem with the garage door opener (including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken coils and burned out motor).Instead, take a few moments that break the connection. Use a heat gun or hair dryer to melt the ice. Standard de-icing products will also work. And, if you are careful not to damage the door or the seal on the bottom of the door, use a flat shovel or similar tool to chip away at the ice.Once you get the door open, clear any water, ice or snow from the spot on the garage floor where the door rests when closed. That way, you should be able to plan on getting the door open next time you need it.Replacing Broken GlassI don't know about your record, but I have broken the glass on garage doors from both the inside and the outside. In the former case, I put the end of a 2×4 through a pane, and in the latter (and a much more common occurrence) an errant pass with a basketball (or perhaps it was a fit of anger after yet another missed shot) did the duty.Regardless of the cause, this is one problem you want to fix as soon as possible. Broken glass is a safety issue, a security problem, and an invitation to every bird and hornet in the neighborhood to make your garage their next home.It's not difficult to replace a pane of glass. ​Learn how with these instructions.Keep It SafeGarage doors are much safer these days than they used to be. That is especially true of garage doors equipped with garage door openers. Older garage door openers did not have the kinds of safety features that would stop them before closing on a child or pet wandering in or out of the garage while the door closed. That made for many tragic stories.But the improvements in safety haven't eliminated safety concerns when it comes to garage doors. Everyone needs to understand how to stay safe in the garage. See 10 Garage Door Safety Tips for some suggestions. Garage Door Opener ProblemsHave you ever noticed just how much you use, and rely on, your garage door opener? Sure, we spend the big bucks for attractive front doors to our homes, but for many of us, the actual coming and going takes place through the garage. And that means we depend on the garage door opening and closing at the press of a button.So, when the garage door opener decides to take a day off, it can leave you stuck outside, probably during a rain or snow storm. Though they may seem complicated, there really are several things most homeowners can do to diagnose and repair opener failures. A good place to start is with Troubleshooting the Most Common Garage Door Opener Problems.Replacing a Garage DoorThere are really only a couple of reasons why you would consider replacing your garage door. Either is has stopped working properly, or you are sick of the way it looks. Most often, it is some combination of those two factors.Unfortunately, shopping for a new garage door isn't a particularly easy process. Most of us rarely perform this type of shopping, and there really aren't a lot of consumer publications offering solid information on the best choices.It helps to break things down into bite-sized pieces. Your first thought might be along the lines of “What is a new garage door going to cost me?” A good place to look for answers to that question is with these frequently asked questions about the costs of a new garage door.From there, you ought to consider the different materials that garage doors are constructed from (see Choosing the Best Garage Door Material. Once you understand something about materials, you then need to make sure you choose the style of garage door that best complements your house. For that, see Understanding Garage Door Styles.Concerned about doing the right thing for the environment? Then take a look at Choosing a Green Garage Door.Finally, once you've narrowed down the type of garage door you want to grace the front of your garage, you will want to Get the Best Deal on a Garage Door Replacement. And part of that process will probably require that you find a good garage door installer. Read More
fix garage door 1

Garage doors lead pretty simple lives. Up, down, up, down, over and over until they suddenly don't work the way they should. Fortunately, that simple life usually makes for relatively simple repairs. Sometimes, though, even reliable old garage doors bite the dust.If you are having trouble with your garage door, here are some tips on what to do.Quick Garage Door FixesWhen your garage door starts acting up, more often than not it is telling you it's time to do a bit of maintenance. So, before hitting the panic button, try these simple repairs. First, examine the rollers and tracks. If you can't remember the last time you cleaned them (and they look the part!), give them a good brushing and then add some lubricant. Next, perform these simple garage door maintenance tasks.If none of this fixes your problems, or if you would rather just let someone else fuss with the problem, take a look at How To Find the Best Garage Door Installers and Repairmen.Silencing a Noisy Garage DoorNoisy garage doors cause all kinds problems, especially for anyone who has to sleep above or next to the garage. Fortunately, most noisy garage door problems can be fixed with a combination of routine maintenance and the replacement of a few parts. For more information on the latter, see How To Quiet a Noisy Garage Door.Frozen Garage Door?It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, those also happen to be the kinds of days when cold and moisture combine to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button.Other times, however, the door refuses to budge. When this happens to you, stop hoping that if you hit that button enough times, a miracle will happen. About the only thing that is going to happen is that you cause a much bigger problem with the garage door opener (including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken coils and burned out motor).Instead, take a few moments that break the connection. Use a heat gun or hair dryer to melt the ice. Standard de-icing products will also work. And, if you are careful not to damage the door or the seal on the bottom of the door, use a flat shovel or similar tool to chip away at the ice.Once you get the door open, clear any water, ice or snow from the spot on the garage floor where the door rests when closed. That way, you should be able to plan on getting the door open next time you need it.Replacing Broken GlassI don't know about your record, but I have broken the glass on garage doors from both the inside and the outside. In the former case, I put the end of a 2×4 through a pane, and in the latter (and a much more common occurrence) an errant pass with a basketball (or perhaps it was a fit of anger after yet another missed shot) did the duty.Regardless of the cause, this is one problem you want to fix as soon as possible. Broken glass is a safety issue, a security problem, and an invitation to every bird and hornet in the neighborhood to make your garage their next home.It's not difficult to replace a pane of glass. ​Learn how with these instructions.Keep It SafeGarage doors are much safer these days than they used to be. That is especially true of garage doors equipped with garage door openers. Older garage door openers did not have the kinds of safety features that would stop them before closing on a child or pet wandering in or out of the garage while the door closed. That made for many tragic stories.But the improvements in safety haven't eliminated safety concerns when it comes to garage doors. Everyone needs to understand how to stay safe in the garage. See 10 Garage Door Safety Tips for some suggestions. Garage Door Opener ProblemsHave you ever noticed just how much you use, and rely on, your garage door opener? Sure, we spend the big bucks for attractive front doors to our homes, but for many of us, the actual coming and going takes place through the garage. And that means we depend on the garage door opening and closing at the press of a button.So, when the garage door opener decides to take a day off, it can leave you stuck outside, probably during a rain or snow storm. Though they may seem complicated, there really are several things most homeowners can do to diagnose and repair opener failures. A good place to start is with Troubleshooting the Most Common Garage Door Opener Problems.Replacing a Garage DoorThere are really only a couple of reasons why you would consider replacing your garage door. Either is has stopped working properly, or you are sick of the way it looks. Most often, it is some combination of those two factors.Unfortunately, shopping for a new garage door isn't a particularly easy process. Most of us rarely perform this type of shopping, and there really aren't a lot of consumer publications offering solid information on the best choices.It helps to break things down into bite-sized pieces. Your first thought might be along the lines of “What is a new garage door going to cost me?” A good place to look for answers to that question is with these frequently asked questions about the costs of a new garage door.From there, you ought to consider the different materials that garage doors are constructed from (see Choosing the Best Garage Door Material. Once you understand something about materials, you then need to make sure you choose the style of garage door that best complements your house. For that, see Understanding Garage Door Styles.Concerned about doing the right thing for the environment? Then take a look at Choosing a Green Garage Door.Finally, once you've narrowed down the type of garage door you want to grace the front of your garage, you will want to Get the Best Deal on a Garage Door Replacement. And part of that process will probably require that you find a good garage door installer.